Aussie pools come of age

Summer is nearly here and with it comes a desire to float in the restorative powers of water – preferably under a clear blue sky in your own backyard.

 

More than 12 per cent of Aussie households have a pool, with a significant number of them here in Melbourne.

 

Yet, given our love of all things aquatic, you might think that pools are quintessentially Australian – but you’d be wrong!

 

Pool history  

 

Did you know that public baths and pools have been around for thousands of years with the first one believed to have been constructed in Pakistan about 5,000 years ago?

Of course, the Romans liked to take baths, too (amongst other shenanigans) and took their innovation of heating water via hot springs to the world some 2,000 years ago.

 

Even back in the 1844, the first swimming pool club was officially opened in Kent in the United Kingdom.

 

Back in those days, though, water quality was an issue, but the adoption of filtration and chlorination meant that by the start of the 20th Century pools were cleaner than they had ever been.

 

Fast forward to after World War II when pool demand not only started to escalate but design finally started to change after thousands of years of similar pool shapes as well as intricate tiling.

 

Perhaps one of the biggest inventions was the development of fibreglass pools in 1957, which corresponded with the baby boom, and resulted in the humble backyard Aussie pool becoming affordable to the masses.

 

Over the years, above-ground pools were replaced by below-ground ones, with spa pools growing in prominence, too.

 

Pools today come in all shapes and sizes – the only limitation being your imagination, the size of your wallet, and the space you have available.

New legislation has also come into play which makes our backyard pools safer than ever before.

 

In fact, the Victorian Government have introduced new regulations that require pool owners to register their pools as well as undergo regular inspections to ensure that swimmers young and old are safe at all times.  

 

The evolution of the pool

The Aussie pool has certainly come of age over recent years with roof-top locations being a popular accessory in new high-rise developments especially.

 

There is no doubt that the evolution of the humble pool is continuing after thousands of years – especially given the smaller lot sizes that are part and parcel of city living these days.

 

So, even if you have a small backyard, you don’t have to give up on your dream of owning your very own pool.

 

Designs to consider include:

 

1.Plunge pools

 

Plunge pools are small and deep and are designed simply for soaking and relaxing, which means they’re perfect for small spaces as well as being cost efficient.

 

2.Lap pools

 

If you have a narrow block, a lap pool is the ideal solution, which can be installed behind the side of your house given its design is all about length rather than width.

 

3.Petite infinity pools

 

Infinity pools are not just for those lucky souls who live by the beach. They are also a great option for houses on slopes or hills, which can leverage off the natural topography of the block.

 

4.Garden-side pools

 

One of the most popular pool designs is one that incorporates nature, which makes even the smallest of pools look great, plus you have the added charm of soaking amongst beautiful shrubs and flowers.  

 

5.Free-form pools

 

One of the cleverest designs is in-ground pools that emulate the shape of your backyard to ensure you are maximising the space available.

 

6.Hidden pools

 

A relatively new concept are hidden pools, which incorporate moveable floors that hide or reveal your pool at the click of a button!

As you can see, the humble Aussie backyard pool is not so humble anymore.

 

They can transform even the smallest of backyards into something very special, while providing countless hours of watery fun or relaxation during the hot summer months.

What would you rather do?

Lounge around in a pool or be stuck inside in front of an air-conditioner?